Buchart Horn Architects
  West Chester Borough | Chestnut Street Parking Garage   The 35-year-old Mosteller Garage, with 414 parking spaces, was no longer adequate to fulfill nearby parking demand in the Borough of West Chester. Borough Council decided to demolish and replace the facility with a new seven-story garage with 689 parking spaces. Buchart Horn provided planning and architectural and engineering design for the new facility, which is more attractive, safer, and more convenient for users.  After presentation of several alternatives, the selected design, intended to blend with the Borough’s historic downtown, has a precast brick exterior whose color and texture match the local context. The design includes large arches to create a civic gesture and uses banners, awnings, ironwork, and window boxes on the lower level to provide pedestrian scale. The structure incorporates a third elevator, better security, ‘graffiti guard’ treatment for the stairwells, and other amenities. Debris from the demolition was recycled, processed on-site, and reused in the structure’s foundation.  Parking system revenues were pledged to fund the debt that financed the garage, which had a final cost of $12,056,850. The new facility opened in the fall of 2010.

West Chester Borough | Chestnut Street Parking Garage

The 35-year-old Mosteller Garage, with 414 parking spaces, was no longer adequate to fulfill nearby parking demand in the Borough of West Chester. Borough Council decided to demolish and replace the facility with a new seven-story garage with 689 parking spaces. Buchart Horn provided planning and architectural and engineering design for the new facility, which is more attractive, safer, and more convenient for users.

After presentation of several alternatives, the selected design, intended to blend with the Borough’s historic downtown, has a precast brick exterior whose color and texture match the local context. The design includes large arches to create a civic gesture and uses banners, awnings, ironwork, and window boxes on the lower level to provide pedestrian scale. The structure incorporates a third elevator, better security, ‘graffiti guard’ treatment for the stairwells, and other amenities. Debris from the demolition was recycled, processed on-site, and reused in the structure’s foundation.

Parking system revenues were pledged to fund the debt that financed the garage, which had a final cost of $12,056,850. The new facility opened in the fall of 2010.